How American Gothic became an icon

How American Gothic became an icon

How did American Gothic go from third place painting to icon? There's a story to this famous painting. Find the Overrated Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/OverratedTheShow/ Find Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Grant Wood's American Gothic is a classic painting. But to understand its fame, you have to learn some context about how it became an icon. When Grant Wood painting his sister and dentist in front of a house in Eldon, Iowa, he didn't know his painting would become iconic. But American Gothic soon became the subject of countless homages and parodies. Wood's place in American art history is unique — and worth knowing to truly appreciate American Gothic. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How QWERTY conquered keyboards

How QWERTY conquered keyboards

There's a big chance your keyboard says QWERTY. In this episode of Vox's Overrated, Phil Edwards investigates the keyboard's history. Find Overrated on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/OverratedThe... Find Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ If you've ever been curious about typewriter history, the rise of QWERTY wasn't an accident. Typing and typewriters weren't always around, and the inventor of the QWERTY typewriter layout didn't know it would become the standard. Over time, however, business reasons and typing education made QWERTY a standard across the industry and, eventually, for the vast majority of typists. Though there are exceptions to QWERTY's domination, for the most part, this keyboard layout remains the default even today. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO

How the Mona Lisa became so overrated

How the Mona Lisa became so overrated

It's not just the smile. There are a few real reasons Mona is so famous. Vox's Phil Edwards looked into it... Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Read the full article for citations and details here: http://www.vox.com/2016/9/20/12941736/mona-lisa-famous Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why we still need courtroom sketch artists

Why we still need courtroom sketch artists

In an age where everyone's phone has a camera, why do we still rely on sketch artists to document trials? Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o We sat down with Christine Cornell, a courtroom sketch artist who has been covering trials for over 40 years to talk about why even in an age where everybody's cellphones have cameras on them, we still often need artists to portray what happens in courtrooms. She has covered the trials of Bill Cosby, Donald Trump, Martha Stewart, and Martin Shkreli, as well as people like the Boston Bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and El Chapo. She explains what it takes to be a courtroom sketch artist and how she think that compassion is one of the key traits artists must possess. She also gives a demonstration of her technique by drawing a portrait of Dean. Make sure to check out Christine's website for more examples of the many trials she's covered over her career http://www.christinecornell.com

How cars went from boxy to curvy

How cars went from boxy to curvy

The big shift from boxy cars in the '80s to curvy cars in the '90s, explained. Read more: http://www.vox.com/2015/6/11/8762373/car-design-curves Magazine archive from: http://oldcarbrochures.org/ Automotive Hall of Fame footage from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaOP6dZkFf4 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The origin of the '80s aesthetic

The origin of the '80s aesthetic

The design phenomenon that defined the decade Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Read more about the Memphis Group: https://designmuseum.org/memphis http://74.93.158.225/~zanone/MemphisDesign/MemphisDesign_index.html#.U0od5MBDoWw.bitly https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1058/1166/files/memphis_milano.pdf?14149556525736315536 http://www.tunicastudio.com/magazine/issue-no-3/article/memphis-group For more work from the designers: Peter Shire http://petershirestudio.com/ Nathalie Du Pasquier http://www.nathaliedupasquier.com/home2.html Michele De Lucchi http://archive.amdl.it/en/index-search.asp?q=memphis&x=0&y=0 Aldo Cibic https://www.cibicworkshop.com/article/memphis-design-movement /// Memphis Design movement dominated the '80s with their crazy patterns and vibrant colors. Many designers and architects from all around the world contributed to the movement in order to escape from the strict rules of modernism. Although their designs didn't end up in people's homes, they inspired many designers working in different mediums. After their first show in Milan in 1981, everything from fashion to music videos became influenced by their visual vocabulary. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How did pink become a girly color?

How did pink become a girly color?

Jennifer Wright explains how the color pink became associated with girls. Racked article: http://www.racked.com/2015/3/20/8260341/pink-color-history Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why cartoon characters wear gloves

Why cartoon characters wear gloves

Animators had a few tricks up their slee...err gloves. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The bizarre physics of fire ants

The bizarre physics of fire ants

They're not just an animal, they're a material. And that's got engineers interested. // Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For more information about the Hu lab: http://www.hu.gatech.edu/ Red imported fire ants (solenopsis invicta) are native to South America and an invasive species in the United States. One of the adaptations that makes them so hardy is that they can build large structures by linking their bodies together. This is how they form rafts that can float during floods. When they're aggregated together, fire ants can be seen as a material and the Hu lab at Georgia Tech has been testing that material for years. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why knights fought snails in medieval art

Why knights fought snails in medieval art

Look in the margins of medieval books and you'll find an unusual theme: knights vs. snails. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Lillian Randall's paper is here: https://www.scribd.com/document/263159779/The-Snail-in-Gothic-Marginal-Warfare And Michael Camille's book about marginal art can be found here: http://www.reaktionbooks.co.uk/display.asp?K=9780948462283 http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/I/bo3536323.html Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Medieval snails and knights — who knew? It turns out that medieval illuminated manuscripts featured a lot of bizarre imagery in the margins, but this pocket of art history might be one of the most intriguing. Scholar Lilian Randall provides the best theory for the unusual motif: these medieval knights fought snails in the margins because snails represented the Lombards, who had become widely despised lenders throughout Europe. Snail was an insult and, over time, it became a type of meme detached from its original meaning. Of course, like much of art history, this theory is just a theory. But it gives us an insight into the rich culture of marginal art and all the complexity, confusion, and amusement that sits on the side of the page. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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